New guidance released on HIV in primary care

The recommendations from the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America update a 2013 guideline on this topic and reflect the changing primary care needs of people with HIV who have longer lifespans due to improved treatment.


The HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America recently released updated guidance on managing patients with HIV in primary care.

The guidance updates the group's 2013 guideline on this topic and reflects the primary care needs of people with HIV who have longer lifespans due to improved availability of effective treatments. It was developed by an expert panel based on literature published from 2013 to December 2019, as well as guidelines from the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices released in January 2020 and research on COVID-19. The guidance's 96 recommendations cover optimization of care engagement, medication adherence, and viral suppression; initial evaluation and routine health care maintenance; and management of metabolic and other comorbid conditions associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) and aging, among other topics. The guidance also includes a new section on special considerations for transgender and gender-diverse populations and on COVID-19 in people with HIV.

“While these recommendations seek to provide optimal medical care for persons with HIV, establishing a relationship of trust should guide the structure of the medical visit, the order of ascertainment of medical information, and the delivery of care and treatment,” the guidance said. “For persons who experience stigma and discrimination, optimal care outcomes are dependent on a stigma-free and welcoming care environment. Attention to other barriers that impact care engagement and continuous ART access is essential for successful outcomes.”

The guidance was published Nov. 6 by Clinical Infectious Diseases and is available online.